Can Science Fiction Save the Earth?

Dan Bloom Hopes "Cli-Fi"* Will Sway Non-Believers

Image result for Dan BloomIn the 1957 pulp classic On the Beach, the novelist and aeronautical engineer Nevil Shute imagined a horrific scenario in the aftermath of World War III. A small group of survivors clustered in southern Australia await the arrival of a deadly radioactive cloud, contemplating the near-certainty that the rest of humanity has already perished.

It’s a terrifying prospect, of course, which is why the book has retained its grip on the public imagination, adapted twice as a movie and, in 2008, as a BBC radio broadcast. Dan Bloom first read On the Beach in a high school English class in 1967. It gave him Cold War nightmares.

James Sullivan
James Sullivan is the author of books on George Carlin, James Brown and the history of blue jeans, a regular contributor to the Boston Globe and former staff critic for the San Francisco Chronicle. Follow him on Twitter @sullivanjames.

* Climate fiction, or climate change fiction, popularly abbreviated as cli-fi (modelled after the assonance of "sci-fi") is a term describing a growing body of fiction literature that deals with climate change and global warming. (Wikipedia)